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Why writing by hand beats typing for thinking and learning

Researchers are learning that handwriting engages the brain in ways typing can't match.

Arizona doctors can come to California to perform abortions under new law signed by Gov. Newsom

California's law is meant to circumvent an Arizona law that bans nearly all abortions in that state.

Why you should think twice before posting that cute photo of your kid online

The phenomenon called "sharenting" poses potential dangers from identity theft to harassment.

Like to bike? Your knees will thank you and you may live longer, too

A large new study shows people who bike have less knee pain and arthritis than those who do not.

Lessons from rattlesnake class in the American Southwest

The first thing students learn is that basically everything they thought they knew about rattlesnakes is a myth.

Phoenix's semiconductor hiring is slow despite federal investment

The government is spending billions to support semiconductor manufacturing in the U.S. But trainees seeking chipmaking jobs may have to wait.

Arizona is boosting efforts to protect people from the extreme heat after hundreds died last summer

Arizona's new heat officer is working with local governments and nonprofit groups to open more cooling centers and ensure homes have working air conditioners.

Less alcohol, or none at all, is one path to better health

Moderate drinking was once thought to have benefits for the heart but better research methods have thrown cold water on that idea.

As Phoenix makes way for semiconductor factories, this business is saving the native plants that were there first

Here's the story of one business at the intersection of conservation and growth amid Phoenix’s semiconductor boom.

CHIPS funds are heading to Phoenix, “ground zero for the new economy”

An influx of federal investment in the city's semiconductor industry is meant to reshape the economy. But will it work?

One of the greatest: UA's unsung wheelchair basketball hero, Rudy Gallego

We meet Rudy Gallego, the man who started the University of Arizona's first adaptive sports team, wheelchair basketball.

As bird flu spreads in cows, here are 4 big questions scientists are trying to answer

Scientists say the risk to people is minimal, but open questions remain, including how widespread the outbreak is and how the virus is spreading.

Pac-12 players to watch as the conference gets ready to splinter across the country

The Pac-12 will splinter apart before fall camp starts, with all but two teams heading to new conferences.

UnitedHealth says wide swath of patient files may have been taken in Change cyberattack

UnitedHealth says files with personal information that could cover a "substantial portion of people in America" may have been taken in the cyberattack on its Change Healthcare business.

With close calls mounting, the FAA will require more rest for air traffic controllers

More must be done to reduce fatigue among air traffic controllers amid an ongoing staffing shortage.

The Buzz: Historic Markers Around the State

We wrap up a series of stories from around the state by telling three historic stories.

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